I'd forgotten how often we saw Magritte (colubra) wrote,
I'd forgotten how often we saw Magritte
colubra

books begun in June

1: Dragon, Stephen Brust: The brustilivromania continues.
2: Forty Signs of Rain, Kim Stanley Robinson: This one is probably worth waiting for the sequels. It's OK-- but the action doesn't really take off anywhere in the book, and this is disappointing. I've SEEN Robinson write good; so far, this is Robinson setting up good.
3: Wonder Bread & Ecstasy: the Life and Death of Joey Stephano, Charles Isherwood: a sort of bio sort of True Crime thing, about a relatively well-known gay porn icon. Given that I had a thing for Mr. Stephano in the worst possible way, I had to. It's actually pretty well-written.
4: Storm Front, Jim Butcher: Rather a weird thing to read while waiting for the Pride parade to commence, given Jim's own perspective on the world. Very straight fellow. Very nice fellow. This was a re-read: just needed to grab something to stay sane while waiting.
5: Song of Susannah, Stephen King: Dark Tower book 6. Better than book 5 and 4, but not, in my opinion, as enjoyable as 3. Still- darn good stuff. Some of the best writing King's done in years, in my view.
6: Conquistador, S. M. Stirling: I am reminded by this book of the words of Dorothy Parker: 'This is not a book to be set aside lightly. No, it should be thrown, with great force'. DO NOT READ THIS BOOK OH MY GOD NO.
7: Book of Days, Gene Wolfe: Generally, I don't enjoy Wolfe's short fiction. This book is QUITE an exception. I think it was his conceit of trying to write a book of short fiction that all focused around various holidays that made it work: he had an overarcing idea, and therefore, he could write.
8: Castle of the Otter, Gene Wolfe: I don't recommend this one to people who haven't already read the Book of the New Sun. I enjoyed it a lot, but I had context from having read the aforementioned quartet.
9: The Ringworld Throne, Larry Niven: Not one of Niven's better books. Re-read solely because a new Ringworld book is coming, and I realized I didn't remember a page of this one.
10: Spares, Michael Marshall Smith: I Liked Only Forward better. This one sort of derives off the same basic plot construction, which is saddening. It ties off solidly, though-- which is a problem with Only Forward's end.
11: I Am Alive And You Are All Dead: A Journey into the mind of Philip K. Dick, Emmanuel Carrere: It's a PKD bio. Of COURSE I'm reading it.
It also seems to be a somewhat rather well-written one.
12: The Golden Gryphon, ed. Turner & Halpern: an interesting collection of short stories. Nothing to fall all over yourself for, but nothing that sucks.
13: On Pirates, Wm. Ashbless, Tim Powers, & James Blaylock. I love Ashbless' work, and Powers and Blaylock truly edit it well in concert.
14: The Devils In The Details, Powers/Blaylock: A limited press trio of shorts: one written by each of them, and one collaboration. Some very strong stuff in here.
15: Move Under Ground, Nick Mamatas. An intriguing and strange book- a beautiful pastiche-tribute of Lovecraft & Kerouac. Amazingly well-written, and it manages to seamlessly blend these two different voices.
16: The Knight, Gene Wolfe: Eeeh. It's OK. I dunno, I like Wolfe's 'science fantasy' stuff more.
17: Malafrena, Ursula K. LeGuin: First LeGuin I've read that didn't hook me right away. This is going to be a slow one, I can tell.
18: Voice of the Fire, Alan Moore: it's INTERESTING seeing Alan Moore's eye for detail turned to the novel. VERY interesting. I don't know that I'd recommend this to someone who wasn't a fan of his graphic fiction work, but I'm definitely glad I read it.

Chriiipes. So far this year? 66 books.
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